Live Updates: Tropical Storm Beta crawls towards Texas and Louisiana

Tropical Storm Beta, in an especially busy 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, is crawling off the coast of Texas and Louisiana and threatens to bring flash flooding to areas still impacted by Hurricane Laura.

Beta could bring up to 20 inches of rain to some areas of those states over the next several days. It was set to make landfall along Texas’ central or upper Gulf Coast late Monday night.

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Tropical Storm Beta crawls off Texas coast, threatens flash flooding into Louisiana

The latest tropical storm in an exceptionally busy 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is crawling off the coast of Texas, threatening to bring flash flooding to areas still impacted by Hurricane Laura.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said early Sunday that Tropical Storm Beta is packing maximum sustained winds of 60 mph and is located about 200 miles southeast of Galveston, Texas, moving west-northwest at 3 mph.

“It’s not really moving anywhere, but it will eventually start to do so,” Fox News’ Chief Meteorologist Rick Reichmuth said on “Fox & Friends Weekend.” “Probably make some sort of landfall. A strong tropical storm across parts of the central Texas coastline, it’s going to bring a lot of rain.”

EST WAY TO PREPARE FOR A STORM SURGE

According to forecasters at the NHC, Beta is forecast to slowly move towards the Texas coast and make landfall by Monday night. A tropical storm warning is in effect from Port Aransas, Texas to Morgan City, La., with a storm surge warning posted from Port Aransas to Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Beta swirls over the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Texas and Louisiana on Sept. 20, 2020.

Tropical Storm Beta swirls over the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Texas and Louisiana on Sept. 20, 2020.
(NOAA/GOES-East)

Little change in strength is forecast before Beta reaches the Texas coast, and weakening is anticipated once the storm moves inland. Earlier predictions had Beta reaching hurricane strength before making landfall.

Forecasters warn that through Thursday, Beta is expected to bring 8 to 12 inches of rainfall, with isolated amounts of 20 inches, from the middle Texas coast to southern Louisiana.

“Tropical Storm Beta is forecast to move very slowly toward the Texas coast over the next couple of days,” the National Weather Sevice’s Weather Prediction Center tweeted.  “Heavy rain will likely lead to flash flooding  from the middle Texas coast to southern Louisiana.”

Beta’s slow movement, including persistent winds, raised concerns about a dangerous storm surge and tide that could reach up to 4 feet in some areas.

“A lot of rain for some people,” Reichmuth said on “Fox & Friends.”

TROPICAL STORM BETA PREDICTED TO STRENGTHEN AND HIT GULF COAST NEXT WEEK

Coastal communities began preparing for Beta over the weekend, with the city of Galveston and Galveston County on Saturday issuing voluntary evacuation orders, along with the city of Seabrook.

Waves crash as Houston resident Tinh Pham fishes from the rocks at Diamond Beach on the west end of the Galveston Seawall in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

Waves crash as Houston resident Tinh Pham fishes from the rocks at Diamond Beach on the west end of the Galveston Seawall in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.
(Stuart Villanueva/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)

Mayor Pro Tem Craig Brown said in a statement that high tides and up to 10 inches of expected rainfall would leave roads impassable, especially along the city’s west end and low-lying areas.

Stacey Young gives her daughter, Kylee Potts, a piggyback ride across the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

Stacey Young gives her daughter, Kylee Potts, a piggyback ride across the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.
(Stuart Villanueva/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)

County Judge Mark Henry said during a Saturday news conference that his concern is also based on rising waters creating a storm surge and that a mandatory evacuation is not expected.

Houston resident Lupe Don removes his flip-flops while moving his car from the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

Houston resident Lupe Don removes his flip-flops while moving his car from the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.
(Stuart Villanueva/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)

“If you can survive in your home for three or four days without power and electricity, which we’re not even sure that’s going to happen, you’re OK,” Henry said. “If it’s uncomfortable or you need life-support equipment, maybe go somewhere else.”

The storm system may bring more misery to Lake Charles, La., where thousands of people remain without power more than three weeks after Hurricane Laura slammed into the region.

LOUISIANA RESIDENTS FACE TOUGH ROAD TO RECOVERY WITH CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS AFTER HURRICANE LAURA

Donald Jones, a NWS meteorologist based in Lake Charles, said in a Saturday briefing that Beta could bring up to 20 inches of rain in parts of the area.

“A lot of people have been saying, ‘Is this going to be like Harvey? Is this going to be like Imelda?'” Jones said. “We’re not talking about rainfall totals yet that are on the orders of magnitude that we saw with that.”

Tyler Heads totes his belongings through tidewaters as he and other beachgoers cross the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

Tyler Heads totes his belongings through tidewaters as he and other beachgoers cross the flooding Stewart Beach parking lot in Galveston, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.
(Stuart Villanueva/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)

Imelda, which struck southeast Texas in 2019, was one of the wettest cyclones on record while Harvey dumped more than 50 inches of rain on Houston in 2017. But if Beta slows down, rainfall totals could go higher than 20 inches

“Harvey was a very specific and unique event, but we are talking about the same idea in terms of very heavy, heavy rainfall,” he said.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Beta is one of three named storms whirling in the Atlantic basin during an exceptionally busy hurricane season. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has broken numerous records, as forecasters on Friday, ran out of traditional names and went to the Greek alphabet for storms Alpha and Beta.

This was only the second time in history that hurricane center forecasters have had to pull out the Greek alphabet for names, with the last time being 2005.

If the system makes landfall in Texas it would be the ninth named storm to make landfall in the continental U.S. in 2020. Colorado State hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach said that would tie a record set in 1916.

Hurricane season starts June 1 and ends Nov. 30, but September historically produces the most Atlantic Ocean basin tropical activity.

NOAA forecasters have been calling for up to 25 named storms this season with winds of 39 mph or higher; of those, seven to 10 could become hurricanes. Among those hurricanes, three to six will be major, classified as Category 3, 4 and 5 with winds of 111 mph or higher.

That’s far above an average year. Based on 1981 to 2010 data, that is 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

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So far this year, there have been 23 named storms, including eight hurricanes and of those, two major hurricanes.

Parts of the Alabama coast and Florida Panhandle are still reeling from the effects of Hurricane Sally, which roared ashore on Wednesday.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



Hurricane Sally strengthens to Category 2 storm, expect life-threatening flooding: officials

Good morning and welcome to Fox News. Here’s what you need to know as you start your day …
Hurricane Sally expected to produce historic life-threatening flooding

Hurricane Sally has strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 100 mph as it moves north-northeastward and is expected to reach the northern Gulf coast later on Wednesday morning, the National Hurricane Center in Miami reported at 1 a.m. ET Wednesday.

A sustained wind of 76 mph, with a gust to 96 mph, was recently reported in Sally’s northern eyewall by a NOAA buoy, which was located about 50 miles southeast of Mobile, Ala, an updated statement by the hurricane center reported.

At the time of the statement, the hurricane was located approximately 65 miles south-southeast from Mobile and approximately 60 miles southwest of Pensacola, Fla.

In addition, significant flash and urban flooding – including widespread minor- to moderate-river flooding – is likely across inland parts of Mississippi along with Alabama, Georgia and western Carolina. CLICK HERE FOR MORE ON OUR TOP STORY.

In other developments:
– FEMA Administrator maps Hurricane Sally threat: ‘Don’t take the storm for granted’
– Hurricane Sally floods Gulf Coast as officials urge residents in low-lying areas to ‘run from the water’
– Hurricane Sally’s eye, choppy seas revealed as storm lurks off Gulf Coast
– 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is running out of names, so what happens next?

Social media post on two shot deputies lands Los Angeles-area city manager on paid administrative leave
The city manager of Lynwood, a Los Angeles-area suburb, was put on paid administrative leave Tuesday after his social media post on the ambush shooting of two sheriffs’ deputies over the weekend was heavily criticized.

Jose Ometeotl was put on leave pending an internal investigation, Lynwood City Councilman Salvador Alatorre told Fox News, following the council’s closed session meeting Tuesday night. Alatorre put forth the motion to discipline or dismiss Ometeotl following his personal Instagram post that read, “chickens come home to roost” after two deputies were shot multiple times while sitting in their patrol vehicle Saturday in the nearby city of Compton.

Alatorre told Fox News in a text message the move against Ometeotl was “Protocal” [sic] and that “he is gone, will not represent Lynwood anymore.”

“He represents the city of Lynwood 24/7,” Alatorre said Monday. “He cannot make statements while he’s employed by our city, especially when he jeopardizes public safety.” CLICK HERE FOR MORE.

In other developments:
– Compton ‘ambush’ leaves 2 LA County sheriff’s deputies ‘fighting for their lives’
– Lynwood councilman to motion of discipline of city manager over social media post on LA County deputies shooting
– Wounded hero LA County sheriff’s deputy ID’d, was librarian before joining force; reward increased to $200G
– Compton mayor changes tone in wake of ambush shooting of sheriff’s deputies

Alan Dershowitz files $300 million defamation suit against CNN
Famed attorney and Harvard Law School professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz filed a defamation suit against CNN on Tuesday seeking $300 million for what he called a “willful, deliberate, malicious effort to destroy my credibility.”

Dershowitz told Fox News CNN selectively edited a clip of his remarks from the Senate floor during President Trump’s impeachment trial where he broke down the illegalities surrounding a “quid pro quo” as a member of the president’s defense team.

“What CNN did here, and it pains me to say this because, you know, I have friends over there. What they did is they just totally doctored the tape,” Dershowitz told Sean Hannity on Tuesday.

“If they had just shown the part where I said if he does anything illegal he can be impeached — Dershowitz trailed off, “but they doctored the tape to take that out.”

Dershowitz said he plans to donate any awarding to “charities and to good causes,” emphasizing that he’s “not doing this for myself. I’m doing this to hold them accountable.” CLICK HERE FOR MORE.

In other developments:
– Alan Dershowitz: Impeachment has deeply divided our nation – Why weren’t legal experts cross-examined?
– Alan Dershowitz: Mueller wrongly introduces dangerous concept of ‘exoneration’ in review of Trump actions
– Alan Dershowitz: Mueller shouldn’t tell Congress anything about Trump not already in his report

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TODAY’S MUST-READS:
– Chinese virologist: China’s government ‘intentionally’ released COVID-19
– Kim Kardashian announces she’s ‘freezing’ her Instagram, Facebook
Trump pressed on why he took ‘foot off the gas’ on COVID response
– Justice Dept. to announce charges for Chinese government-linked ‘computer intrusion campaign’
– Biden panned for playing ‘Despacito’ at Hispanic Heritage Month event
– Georgia man fleeing deputies leaves behind winning lottery ticket
– Refugees from socialist countries warn Americans: Don’t let it happen here

THE LATEST FROM FOX BUSINESS:
– Fed expected to raise economic forecasts, extend vow to keep rates low
– Snowflake prices IPO at $120 a share
– Oracle, TikTok deal decision imminent

#TheFlashback: CLICK HERE to find out what happened on “This Day in History.”

SOME PARTING WORDS

Sean Hannity, the host of “Hannity,” talked on his show about Joe Biden’s climate change speech, confusion over who’s topping the Democratic ticket and the former vice president’s choice of travel after complaining about fossil fuels.

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Hurricane Sally's eye, choppy seas revealed as storm lurks off Gulf Coast

As a slow-moving Hurricane Sally inches closer to the northern Gulf Coast on Tuesday, those who fly into the storm for important reconnaissance missions have revealed a glimpse of the storm’s center.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said two P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft flew into Sally on Monday to investigate the center of the hurricane.

Each plane performed four passes through the center of the storm, observing the atmospheric conditions in all quadrants of Sally from an altitude of 10,000 feet.

HURRICANE SALLY MAY BRING ‘HISTORIC FLOODING’ TO GULF COAST AS STORM CRAWLS TOWARD LANDFALL

During each mission, scientists on board monitored appropriate measurements as part of examining the storm’s environment, including looking at doppler radar in the plane’s tail to measure wind speeds

Choppy seas in the Gulf of Mexico can be seen from inside Hurricane Sally on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.

Choppy seas in the Gulf of Mexico can be seen from inside Hurricane Sally on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.
(NOAA/James Carpenter)

One of the aircraft was flying through as Sally strengthened to a hurricane. Photos released by NOAA show the eye of the storm during intensification.

The eye of Hurricane Sally can be seen as the storm intensified on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.

The eye of Hurricane Sally can be seen as the storm intensified on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.
(NOAA/James Carpenter)

Another clip from the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center flight shows choppy sea conditions in the Gulf of Mexico.

Hurricane Sally has maximum sustained winds of near 85 mph by Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). As of 11 a.m. EDT, the storm is located about 110 miles south of Mobile, Ala., moving northwest at 2 mph.

Forecasters have warned of storm surge and heavy rains that may cause “historic” flooding in the region.

NOAA scientist Heather Holbach said in a blog post that surface wave height measurements have indicated wave heights upwards of 18 feet on the north side of the hurricane.

2020 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON IS RUNNING OUT OF NAMES, SO WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

“The system continues to become better organized, but there are still some indications that easterly wind shear was impacting the hurricane,” Holbach said.

Some additional strengthening is possible, but forecasters have said it doesn’t matter what category Sally is because the slow movement of this storm will be the biggest danger with a prolonged water event.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

A life-threatening storm surge of 7-9 feet just east of the center of the storm can be expected as well as inland flooding, and hurricane-force winds for many hours will be a major danger in the next 24-36 hours for this area.

Expected rainfall amounts from Hurricane Sally.

Expected rainfall amounts from Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

Severe, widespread flash flooding can also be expected, with a widespread area of 10-20 inches of rain from the Central Gulf Coast to the Florida Panhandle.

Flood watches are up throughout the region in advance of the storm.

Flood watches are up throughout the region in advance of the storm.
(Fox News)

Some isolated spots could even receive upwards of 30 inches of rain.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Residents along the northern Gulf Coast need to pay very close attention to the forecast and know what to do if and when flooding occurs.

Fox News’ Janice Dean contributed to this report.

Hurricane Sally may bring 'historic flooding' to Gulf Coast as storm crawls toward landfall

A slow-moving Hurricane Sally is edging closer to the northern Gulf Coast Tuesday as forecasters are warning of potentially historic flooding to the region.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said as of early Tuesday, Hurricane Sally is a Category 1 storm, packing maximum sustained winds of 85 mph, and is located about 105 miles south-southeast of Biloxi, Miss., moving west-northwest at 2 mph.

“Historic flooding is possible from Sally with extreme life-threatening flash flooding likely through Wednesday along portions of the northern Gulf Coast,” the NHC said.

HURRICANE SALLY MOVES IN ON GULF COAST, TRUMP ‘MONITORING’

Sally is forecast to make landfall sometime between Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, but we may not see a landfall for many hours as the system hovers offshore.

Hurricane Sally lurks off the Gulf Coast in the morning on Sept. 15, 2020.

Hurricane Sally lurks off the Gulf Coast in the morning on Sept. 15, 2020.
(NOAA/GOES-East)

Some additional strengthening is possible, but at this point it doesn’t matter what category Sally is because the slow movement of this storm will be the biggest danger with a prolonged water event.

The forecast track of Hurricane Sally.

The forecast track of Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

A hurricane warning stretches from the Mississippi/Louisiana border to Navarre, Fla., while a storm surge warning is in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River to the Okaloosa/Walton county line in Florida.

The hurricane and tropical storm warnings from Hurricane Sally.

The hurricane and tropical storm warnings from Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

A life-threatening storm surge of 7-9 feet just east of the center of the storm can be expected as well as inland flooding, and hurricane-force winds for many hours will be a major danger in the next 24-36 hours for this area.

The expected storm surge from Hurricane Sally.

The expected storm surge from Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

There is also the risk for tornadoes as the system moves onshore, particularly to the east of the center.

The tornado threat from Hurricane Sally east of the center of the storm.

The tornado threat from Hurricane Sally east of the center of the storm.
(Fox News)

Severe, widespread flash flooding can also be expected, with a widespread area of 10-20 inches of rain from the Central Gulf Coast to the Florida Panhandle.

Expected rainfall amounts from Hurricane Sally.

Expected rainfall amounts from Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

Some isolated spots could even receive upwards of 30 inches of rain.

Flood watches are up throughout the region in advance of the storm.

Flood watches are up throughout the region in advance of the storm.
(Fox News)

Residents along the northern Gulf Coast need to pay very close attention to the forecast and know what to do if and when flooding occurs.

MISSISSIPPI GOVERNOR WARNS COASTAL RESIDENTS OF HURRICANE SALLY: ‘THE TIME TO GET OUT IS NOW’

The storm’s shift to the east with a possible landfall in the Biloxi-Mobile region is still not changing the impacts across southern Louisiana.

The location of Hurricane Sally as of Tuesday morning.

The location of Hurricane Sally as of Tuesday morning.
(Fox News)

A storm surge in the area is still the greatest concern, with 6 to 9 feet expected in areas such as New Orleans. The Big Easy will be spared the worst of the rainfall, wind and surge as Lake Pontchartrain is expecting between 3 and 5 feet.

Forecast models showing the path of Hurricane Sally.

Forecast models showing the path of Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

Levees and flood systems across the region will get a prolonged test of their post-Katrina reinforcements.

Heavy rain from Sally will then spread inland into the Southeast through Wednesday night, with the possibility of inland flooding.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Even as Sally remains out over the Gulf of Mexico, coastal areas are already being impacted.

Waters begin to flood Davis Avenue from the Davis Avenue River in Pass Christian, Miss., Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, as rains associated with incoming Hurricane Sally begin to overflow its banks.

Waters begin to flood Davis Avenue from the Davis Avenue River in Pass Christian, Miss., Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, as rains associated with incoming Hurricane Sally begin to overflow its banks.
(Hunter Dawkins/The Gazebo Gazette via AP)

Photos from Monday showed flooding along Bienville Boulevard in Dauphin Island, Ala.

Some vehicles ran into trouble with high water in the area, which WKRG-TV reported typically floods when a storm approaches the area.

Water levels were also rising in St. Bernard Parish in Louisiana on Monday as the storm neared.

The parish, which had previously declared a state of emergency, set up pumps in the area to prepare for the hurricane’s arrival.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

President Trump has issued emergency declarations for parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama on Monday and on Twitter urged residents to listen to state and local leaders.

Waters from the Gulf of Mexico poor onto a local road, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, in Waveland, Miss.

Waters from the Gulf of Mexico poor onto a local road, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, in Waveland, Miss.
(AP Photo/Gerald Herbrt)

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey sought the presidential declaration after the National Weather Service (NWS) in Mobile warned of the increasing likelihood of “dangerous and potentially historic flooding,” with waters rising as much as 9 feet above ground in parts of the Mobile metro area.

Coastal casinos were also shut down Monday under orders from the Mississippi Gaming Commission.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic basin, this extremely busy hurricane season shows no signs of slowing down.

A strengthening Hurricane Paulette is moving northward away from Bermuda as the final advisory has been issued on Rene.

A look at all the tropical activity in the Atlantic basin.

A look at all the tropical activity in the Atlantic basin.
(NOAA/GOES-East)

Tropical Storm Teddy is forecast to strengthen into a major hurricane later this week as it moves northward into the Central Atlantic. Tropical Storm Vicky is near the Cabo Verde Islands but will be short-lived.

Forecast tracks of all of the current storms in the Atlantic basin.

Forecast tracks of all of the current storms in the Atlantic basin.
(Fox News)

Other than Sally, none of the current systems pose a threat to the U.S.

Fox News’ David Aaro and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

How Norwich weathered a relegation storm, staying united in in the Championship

The trio in charge of Norwich chatted with their players, shaking hands and passing on words of encouragement an hour after the final whistle.

There was Daniel Farke, who shunned offers from around Europe to stick with City after their Premier League flop, as engaging, lively boss as a fan could ask for.

There was smart Director of Football Stuart Webber who showed leadership after the drop, ordered fans to “blame me, it was my strategy” for the relegation in July.

“I didn’t have to sit sulking or crying or lying on the football pitch hoping someone would take a photo of me,” he said. “We had to make sure we didn’t die. We went off that cliff edge and could brush ourselves off and go again.”

And they have.

Daniel Farke guided City to an opening day win against Huddersfield on Saturday and looked to be united with his bosses

Matriarchal Delia Smith, clearly popular with her young charges, was among the squad showing she’s willing the lads to succeed.

It’s early days, but few clubs emerge from the wreckage of relegation, a £60m income cut, a ten game losing streak, no win since February, looking as together and ready for the new challenge as the Canaries.

They didn’t spend silly money last season, relegation clauses in contracts automatically reduced the wage bill this term and only Jamal Lewis has been sold – £15m to Newcastle.

Solid characters have been added like Ben Gibson and Jordan Hugill.

Stability and united front mean Norwich will be among the promotion contenders again.

This was their first win since February when they beat Leicester, 197 days ago, and ended a ten game losing streak from the top flight.

Delia Smith met her players and gave them individual pep talks after the win at Huddersfield

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Webber has overseen more than 460 first team appearances from home grown academy players in the last three years.

Another Adam Idah, just 19, grabbed the winner in Yorkshire against a reslilent Town who were undone only by a terrible backpass by Richard Stearman.

Cork born Idah played twice for Ireland in the week, and nabbed his first league goal.

He said: “All of us work well together even in training, we get each other going. Everyone wants to do well.

“We had a difficult and disappointing end to last season, so this was an unbelievable start to the season and we’re just raring to go.

“Every season once you get off to a good start the confidence comes in.”

Town boss Carlos Corberan said: “We fought with spirit and effort. We couldn’t do enough things to get the result. The team showed the spirit we wanted and a performance, which is the positive.”



Bermuda entirely in Hurricane Paulette's eye as storm lashes island

The entire island of Bermuda was directly in the eye of Hurricane Paulette on Monday morning as the storm threatens to bring another round of damaging winds and torrential rains as it begins to move away.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said as of 6 a.m. EDT, that Paulette is located right over Bermuda, packing maximum sustained winds of 90 mph and moving north-northwest at 13 mph.

“The eye of Paulette will move north-northwestward to northward this morning, bringing the southern portion of the eyewall with hurricane-force winds and torrential across the entire island of Bermuda very soon,” the NHC said.

HURRICANE PAULETTE TO HIT BERMUDA ON SUNDAY EVENING, FORECASTERS SAY

According to the NHC, the eye of Paulette will continue to pass over Bermuda during the next couple of hours.

Satellite imagery shows the island completely in the middle of the eye of the storm, surrounded on all sides by swirling clouds.

The island of Bermuda can be seen directly in the eye of Hurricane Paulette on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.

The island of Bermuda can be seen directly in the eye of Hurricane Paulette on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.
(NOAA/GOES-East)

Those on the island described being in the eye as having “light winds,” with “the tree frogs singing” as the surf continued to roar.

Andrew Moore wrote on Twitter that he could even see “a few stars and planets” after clouds cleared out.

Paulette is currently a Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph, with higher gusts.

Hurricane Paulette is a Category 1 storm as it's over Bermuda.

Hurricane Paulette is a Category 1 storm as it’s over Bermuda.
(Fox News)

“Additional strengthening is likely when Paulette turns northeastward and moves away from Bermuda tonight through Tuesday,” the NHC said.

As the storm moves away from Bermuda, hurricane conditions will return to the island from the south and southeast as the southern eyewall passes over.

Up to 6 inches of rain is possible on the island, with hurricane conditions subsiding by mid-morning as tropical storm conditions persist into the early afternoon.

HURRICANE SEASON PEAK: HERE’S WHY SEPT. 10 IS DAY MOST LIKELY TO HAVE A TROPICAL STORM

Paulette may be over Bermuda, but the storm is generating rough seas that will impact the entire east coast of the United States. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are possible on Monday.

In addition to Paulette, Tropical Storm Sally is gathering strength as it takes aim at the U.S. Gulf Coast

Once a tropical storm, Rene will dissipate on Monday. with no threat to land.

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on Sept. 14, 2020.

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on Sept. 14, 2020.

Tropical Depression 20 strengthened into Tropical Storm Teddy on Monday morning, and was expected to become a “powerful” hurricane later in the week, forecasters said. That storm is forecast to stay in the Central Atlantic with no risk to the U.S. in the next five days.

Yet another disturbance off the coast of Africa, Tropical Depression 21, formed Monday in the eastern portion of the Atlantic Ocean.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Historically, September produces the most Atlantic Ocean basin tropical activity. The current name storms have broken records for how early they formed for their respective letter, continuing a trend during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

Hurricane season's busiest month is September, with activity peaking on Sept. 10.

Hurricane season’s busiest month is September, with activity peaking on Sept. 10.
(Fox News)

NOAA forecasters are now calling for up to 25 named storms with winds of 39 mph or higher; of those, seven to 10 could become hurricanes. Among those hurricanes, three to six will be major, classified as Category 3, 4 and 5 with winds of 111 mph or higher.

Where tropical storms typically develop during the month of September.

Where tropical storms typically develop during the month of September.
(Fox News)

That’s far above an average year. Based on 1981-to-2010 data, that is 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

So far this year, there have been 19 named storms, including six hurricanes and of those, one major hurricane.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30 and includes the names Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred.

The names for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

The names for the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.
(Fox News)

There are only two more names left this season: Vicky and Wilfred. After that, we will move to the Greek alphabet for only the second time in history.

Fox News’ Adam Klotz and Brandon Noriega contributed to this report.

Tropical storm Sally strengthening, prompts hurricane and storm surge warnings

Tropical storm Sally is strengthening, prompting hurricane and storm surge warnings for parts of the northern Gulf Coast.

A hurricane warning for Sally was issued Sunday morning from Grand Isle, La., to Ocean Springs, Miss., and included metropolitan New Orleans. A storm surge warning and a tropical storm warning also were in effect for parts of the Gulf Coast.

“Life threatening storm surge is possible along the Gulf Coast beginning on Monday, and a Storm Surge watch is in effect for areas outside the southeast Louisiana Hurricane and Storm Damage Risk Reduction System from the Mouth of the Mississippi River to the Alabama/Florida border,” the National Weather Service said in a statement released Saturday.

HURRICANE SEASON PEAK: HERE’S WHY SEPT. 10 IS DAY MOST LIKELY TO HAVE A TROPICAL STORM

This Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020 image provided by NOAA shows the formation of Tropical Storm Sally. Tropical Storm Sally has formed off south Florida, becoming the earliest 18th-named tropical storm on record in a busy Atlantic hurricane season.

This Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020 image provided by NOAA shows the formation of Tropical Storm Sally. Tropical Storm Sally has formed off south Florida, becoming the earliest 18th-named tropical storm on record in a busy Atlantic hurricane season.
(NOAA via AP)

On Saturday Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards also declared a state of emergency in advance of tropical storm Sally.

“Make sure that you do what is necessary to prepare for Tropical Storm #Sally,” he tweeted Sunday.

Officials in the New Orleans area issued a mandatory evacuation order for areas outside of levee protection.

TIPS FOR USING A GENERATOR SAFELY DURING A HURRICANE

The storm was about 115 miles west of Port Charlotte, Fla., and 345 miles east-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, according to an advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center at 5:00 a.m. ET Sunday. “Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds have increased to near 50 mph (85 km/h) with higher gusts,” it said. “Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles (150 km) from the center.”

“Sally is moving toward the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 km/h), and a west-northwestward or northwestward motion is expected through Monday,” the National Hurricane Center explained.

Storm surge from Sally was forecast to reach dangerous levels, due in part to the tide. Up to 11 feet of water was predicted from the mouth of the Mississippi River to Ocean Springs, Miss., including Lake Borgne.

HURRICANE LAURA ‘COMPLETELY REVERSED’ TEXAS RIVER FOR ‘ABOUT 12 HOURS’ WHEN IT MADE LANDFALL, OFFICIALS SAY

Other weather systems are also being closely monitored. Hurricane Paulette is moving closer to Bermuda, the National Hurricane Center said early Sunday while tropical depression Rene, which was once a tropical storm, will become a remnant low on Monday.

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Tropical Depression Twenty is expected to gradually strengthen over the next several days.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers



Hurricane season peak: Here's why Sept. 10 is day most likely to have a tropical storm

In terms of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, we’re officially halfway there.

The Atlantic hurricane season officially runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, but statistically, September is the month that produces the most tropical storms and hurricanes.

The date of Sept. 10 is a significant one because it’s the climatological peak, the day you are most likely to have a tropical storm in the Atlantic basin.

HOW STRONG CAN HURRICANES GET? HERE’S A BREAKDOWN OF CATEGORIES AND THE SAFFIR-SIMPSON WIND SCALE

According to Colorado State University hurricane research scientist Phil Klotzbach, about 75% of Atlantic seasons in the satellite era since 1966 have had at least one named storm on Sept. 10. This date happens to also be nearly midway in the season.

About 50% of those years have had at least one hurricane on that date.

Hurricane season's busiest month is September, with activity peaking on Sept. 10.

Hurricane season’s busiest month is September, with activity peaking on Sept. 10.
(Fox News)

For 2020 there’s currently quite a bit of activity happening across the Atlantic basin, but none of it directly impacting the U.S.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said Thursday morning that Tropical Storm Rene is strengthening as it moves across the eastern Atlantic, packing maximum sustained winds of 40 mph as it moves west-northwest at 10 mph about 730 miles west-northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands.

Tropical Storms Paulette (left) and Rene (right) can be seen over the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 10, 2020.

Tropical Storms Paulette (left) and Rene (right) can be seen over the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 10, 2020.
(NOAA/GOES-East)

Rene is forecast to gradually strengthen into a hurricane by Friday night over the open Atlantic, then likely weaken while out at sea.

The second system, Tropical Storm Paulette, is packing winds of 60 mph as it moves west-northwest at 10 mph about 935 miles east-northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands, according to the NHC.

TROPICAL STORM RENE FORECAST TO BECOME HURRICANE, PAULETTE MAY NEAR BERMUDA

Bermuda needs to monitor Paulette for possible tropical storm impacts by Monday, but for now, Paulette is forecast to weaken during the next couple of days, but restrengthening is expected to commence over the weekend.

The forecast tracks of Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene.

The forecast tracks of Tropical Storms Paulette and Rene.
(Fox News)

The storm could be a hurricane by the time it reaches Bermuda.

The NHC is also monitoring two areas for development in the Atlantic. A disturbance southwest of Bermuda will bring some heavy rain to the Carolinas by Friday but is not a major concern or expected to develop further.

Another tropical wave will emerge from the west coast of Africa Thursday and will likely develop into our next named storm in the coming days.

So why is Thursday the “perfect date” for tropical activity?

The patterns during the peak of hurricane season that influence where storms travel.

The patterns during the peak of hurricane season that influence where storms travel.
(Fox News)

The reason why September is the most active month comes down to wind and water temperature. Wind shear is when the winds at the top of the atmosphere.

When they are strong, they can weaken potential storms.

Where tropical storms typically develop during the month of September.

Where tropical storms typically develop during the month of September.
(Fox News)

Generally, those winds are stronger in the spring and gradually weaken during the summer.

By now, there typically is less wind shear. Without wind shear to get in the way, storms can form and grow.

Perhaps more important, tropical storms need warm water to form and grow. Storms need ocean temperatures of roughly 80 degrees or warmer to sustain themselves.

September sea surface temperatures across the Atlantic Ocean.

September sea surface temperatures across the Atlantic Ocean.
(Fox News)

At this point in the season, water temperatures have peaked across most of the Atlantic.

Water temperatures peak in the month of September across the Atlantic basin.

Water temperatures peak in the month of September across the Atlantic basin.
(Fox News)

In many locations, they will begin to slowly cool in late September and October, gradually lowering the odds of tropical activity.

Rene was one of two storms that formed Monday; Tropical Storm Paulette took shape earlier in the day in the central Atlantic, far from land. The two current tropical storms are the earliest 16th and 17th named storms, continuing a trend during the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

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NOAA forecasters are now calling for up to 25 named storms with winds of 39 mph or higher; of those, seven to 10 could become hurricanes. Among those hurricanes, three to six will be major, classified as Category 3, 4 and 5 with winds of 111 mph or higher.

That’s far above an average year. Based on 1981-to-2010 data, that is 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

So far this year, there have been 17 named storms, including five hurricanes and of those, one major hurricane.

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The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30 and includes the names Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred.

The names of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.

The names of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season.
(Fox News)

There are only four more names left this season: Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred. After that, we will move to the Greek alphabet for only the second time in history.

Fox News’ Janice Dean and Brandon Noriega contributed to this report.



How to get rid of visceral fat: Latest diet taking the health world by storm to burn belly

“Essentially, ketosis is a survival mechanism whereby the body is able to keep creating energy using a secondary source, derived from fat, until a person consumes carbohydrates again,” said Natasha.

She continued: “The shift, from using glucose to breaking down fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to six days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates, per day.

“During the diet transition, you will experience uncomfortable side effects from significantly cutting carbs.

“We like to refer to this as the “Veto flu”.

“These may last a few days but will pass once your body has entered ketosis.